Lauren Davis
REALTY EXECUTIVES Boston West | 508-254-0449 | Lauren@LaurensListings.com


Posted by Lauren Davis on 4/26/2017

You should love where you live. Effort to develop homes that fit changing lifestyles could be a reason why new residential properties are gaining steam. It started with tiny houses. But, tiny houses aren't the only trend hitting the housing market. Communal living is also starting to take off.

This is what might happen if you live in a communal home

Millennials and Boomers are starting to choose communal homes and apartments over traditional living environments. Move into a communal apartment and you might live with four to six people. In this living situation, you might:

  • Share a bathroom with all four to six people
  • Cook in a kitchen with a team of people. You might also cook before or after everyone else finishes preparing a meal. To get the most out of a communal property, join your apartment or housemates in the kitchen one or more times a week.
  • Enjoy the company of another resident while you watch television or read a book on the living room sofa
  • Learn to share space with other people and know when to turn your music up or down
  • Rotate the day that you clean one or more rooms at the apartment or house
  • Get used to living with a small personal space. For example, your personal space might be limited to your bedroom.
  • Live with people from diverse backgrounds, including people of different ages and cultures

Pros and cons of living at a communal home

Give yourself time to adjust to living in a communal home if you decide to take this route. After all, there are pros and cons to living at a communal property. One of the biggest pros will affect your wallet. Because you'll be splitting the cost of living at the home with the other residents, living at a communal property can cost less than living at your own apartment or your own house. Other pros and cons associated with living at a communal property include:

Pros

You'll keep up with what's new in the area

Finding someone to go to the movies or out to eat with won't be a problem

Opportunities to learn new languages may abound

Risks of leaving your home vacant, putting it at risk of a home invasion, may be greatly reduced

Cons

Your personal space will be smaller

Should residents at the home change, you'll have to get to know new people

Lack of quiet time - the ability to study or read in total silence might be limited

You will never own the house

Communal living is a good way to meet new people. Living in a communal house is similar to living in a college dorm. There may always be someone to talk with. If you've ever struggled to make friends or struggled with feeling alone, a communal house could be a good move. Before you make the move, conduct a background check on the owner of the property. Visit the home and meet all of the residents. Also, practice safety, the same as you would if you were living in a large apartment complex or a dorm.




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Posted by Lauren Davis on 4/19/2017

Injuries, physical disabilities, surgeries and bone density issues can make it difficult to be mobile. They can also make it challenging to get in and out of a home, including the home of a relative or friend. With a few changes, your home can present less of a challenge for people with unique physical needs. Ensure that banisters outside and inside your home are secure. When you pull on banisters or place weight on them, make sure that they don’t pull away from the ground or wall. This could keep people with physical disabilities safe. It could also help to keep children safe. Although banisters are often used by people who are injured, aging or disabled, ensuring that your banisters are sturdy isn't the only step that you can take to create a home that supports people with unique physical needs. Additional ways that you could create a home environment that supports people with physical disabilities include: Wide walkways – Walkways that are at least 36 inches wide offer added accessibility to your home. Exterior coverings should be high enough to prevent tall people from having to bend over to enter your house without bumping their head or shoulders. Sidewalks should be free of debris, boxes and items that children and adults would have to climb over or maneuver around. Wheelchair ramp – A wheelchair ramp needs to be sturdy and wide enough to support several hundred pounds. During inclement weather, including hard rains and icy conditions, the ramp should be cleared and kept dry. Bathroom support rails – People with conditions like sickle cell anemia, muscular dystrophy and Parkinson’s may need to hold onto a railing to get in and out of the tub or shower. So too might someone who suffered an injury or who is recovering from surgery. Hardware stores sell steel bathroom support rails, but, they must be properly installed. You could hire a professional to install support rails. Adequate lighting – Motion detector lights outside your home serve multiple purposes, including deterring burglars and preventing falls. The lights can be installed near front and back walkways and along roof corners. Nonslip surfaces – Keep sidewalks shoveled and salted in the winter. You could also place rubber mats on porches and inside doorways year round to prevent slips and falls after a rain or whenever people get their feet or shoes wet. Open floor plan – An open floor plan is great at making it easy for parents to keep an eye on young children. An open floor plan also reduces the numbers of doors that people have to push through to go from room to room. Keyless door entry – Similar to benefits derived from an open floor plan, keyless door entry can take the strain out of fumbling with keys. You can also opt for door handles that operate with levers rather than knobs to reduce the numbers of times people with arthritis and other tissue and muscle issues have to work to open doors. Level flooring – Uneven flooring can cause people to stumble, trip and fall. Whether floors are carpeted, tiled or hardwood, ensure that they are even or level. Replace areas that have started to curl or bubble. Security alarms – Install security alarms that not only alert first responders to burglaries but that also alert first responders to falls and accidents on your property. Cabinets – If needed, lower cabinets so that shorter adults can reach plates, cups and glasses. However, avoid placing frequently used items in bottom cabinets that require adults to bend to the floor, potentially making it hard for aging adults or people recovering from injuries to reach the items. The National Directory of Home Modification Resources and state agencies list organizations that provide tools that you can add to your home to make it easier for aging parents, injured people and children and adults with physical disabilities to visit or live in your home. Who knows? Modifications that you make today could allow you to remain in your home years from now.




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Posted by Lauren Davis on 4/12/2017

Whether you telecommute as a full-time employee, operate your own business from home or engage in creative hobbies like web design, writing or painting at home, make sure that you build out your home office the right way. After all, you could easily spend 20 to 40 or more hours a week in your home office. Lack one key component and you could find yourself struggling to focus on your work. Lighten up your day Choose a room in your house that has at least one large window for your home office. Install quality fluorescent or LED lights. Hang light weight blinds at the window, instead of heavy drapes, to allow plenty of natural light to stream into your office. You’ll see better and feel better too. Home office ergonomics Go for an adjustable chair and a desk with a pull-out keyboard tray. While you’re shopping for home office furniture, check to see that the chair you plan on buying is comfortable and aligns well with the desk that you want. Proper desk and chair heights could help you to avoid back and neck discomfort, especially on days when you log lots of hours. Backup computer resources You won’t have to worry about this if your employer gives you an office computer or laptop. But, if you’re an independent contractor or entrepreneur who works from home, you’ll want access to a backup computer should your regular PC go on the blink. A tablet with office software applications, an extra laptop or a low cost desktop can do the trick. Easy filing space There may be times when you need to keep printed documents. For example, you might need to keep printed receipts for tax purposes and printed copies of signed client contracts. Expandable file folders save space. Metal six foot tall filing cabinets can be placed behind your home office door. Another option is to store paper documents in plastic storage bins. The best option depends on how long you need to keep the documents and the volume of printed materials you’ll keep. Great Wi-Fi You’ll get more done faster if you have great Wi-Fi. Internet and computer download speeds should be fast enough to not cause you to have to wait several seconds or a minute or longer before a web page pops up or a Word document opens. As a tip, you can speed up download times by deleting unnecessary files, removing unused and unneeded applications off your computer, turning off pop-up ads, installing good Internet security and anti-virus software and keeping your computer battery in good condition. Spice up your home office Place a few plants in your home office to spruce up the space. Family pictures, posters with motivational quotes on them and artistic gadgets and knick knacks also work well. Eliminate distractions to stay engaged in your work. Avoid checking email throughout the day, answering your cell phone and watching television. Try it and see if your production doesn’t improve.





Posted by Lauren Davis on 4/7/2017

Beautifully renovated, open concept, spacious colonial on corner lot in sought after neighborhood. This home boasts an incredible high-end kitchen w granite counters, gorgeous backsplash, new ss appliances including double ovens, refrigerator w water/ice dispenser, custom cabinetry and an island looking onto the dining room. A wonderful layout for entertaining, the kitchen also opens to the sizeable family room w fireplace, skylights, windows & sliders leading to a patio with built-in benches and a fenced-in yard. Also, off the family room is an inviting three season porch. Upstairs are four bedrooms all with hardwoods and closets and a tastefully, renovated full bath with tiled tub/shower. Other features include: Laundry and half bath conveniently located on first floor, garage w direct entry into home, new electrical, plumbing and septic, plus central vac, security system and shed. Holliston offers highly ranked schools, a lovely downtown, bike/walking trails, Lake Winthrop & more!

More Info on this Property | New Listing Alerts





Posted by Lauren Davis on 4/5/2017

Do you have a bathtub faucet the will not run hot enough water for a hot soak in the tub, or have you ever scalded yourself when you accidentally bumped into the control lever with an elbow while showering? Both of these are common household problems you can fix by adjusting the maximum temperature of the faucet. It only takes a few minutes of your time and basic home tools. In most cases, after a bit of testing and adjustment, you will have your showerhead or bathroom faucet working exactly the way you want it to. How Bathroom Fixture Levers Work Modern single lever shower faucets are typically designed with up to 270 degrees of rotation. When the lever is rotated approximately 45 degrees from the “off” position, the cold water flow is fully engaged. However the hot water remains off. When you continue to rotate the handle, the hot water begins to flow. At approximately 135 degrees of rotation, both the hot and cold water flow are fully engaged. As you continue to rotate the lever, the hot water flow stays on while the cold flow is restricted. At about 270 degrees, the hot water is fully on and the cold-water flow is totally off. A Simple Adjustment Single-lever faucets are designed to be adjustable and the amount of rotation limited. Keep in mind; it is only at the full 270 degrees of rotation that you obtain only hot water. At a less than 270-degree rotation, cold water continues to blend with the hot water flow. If find that the faucet lever will not rotate a full 270 degrees, cold water is continually mixing with the hot flow: the shorter the rotation, the colder water added and the cooler the maximum temperature. Most single shower faucets are set at the factory to prevent total rotation to prevent scalding water causing a bathroom accident with children or the elderly. A simple adjustment will allow you to raise the water temperature to your comfort level while still preventing a total hot flow, which could result in injury. Look Under The Faucet Handle Take a look at the faucet handle to locate the piece of metal or plastic that covers the screw that holds the faucet in place. You can quickly “pop” out the metal or plastic screw cover to loosen the screw and remove the handle. Some older model faucets may have a hole hidden on the underside, requiring a tiny screwdriver or Allen wrench to remove. Once you have removed the handle, you will be able to locate a collar with a small plastic tab sticking out. If the handle were in place, that little plastic tab would stop the rotation before the “maximum hot” position. To visualize how this works look inside the handle or try sliding it back in place and turn the faucet on and off. Some faucet designs have collars with two tabs. On the back collar, the nub is always set straight up, at the 12 o’clock position. The other nub can be pulled out and rotated to the desired setting and reinserted. Remember that the farther away the nub is set from 12 o’clock, the more restricted the lever’s rotation and the cooler the maximum temperature. Other older designs of the single level faucet may present hot and cold adjustment screws. To adjust, always turn the hot water screw counterclockwise, while the cold-water screw turns clockwise.




Tags: Home Repair  
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